Dattoo Personal Skinprint Technology Concept

Dattoos, DNA-based tattoos, create seamless connectivity and are the ultimate in personal technology. The Dattoo is, for now, a concept design by Hartmut Esslinger that uses the skin of the human body itself as hardware and network.


(Dattoo DNA-based personal technology)

The basic idea is to use the body as the basis for hardware, and the skin-covered surface of your body as an interface. As technologists have discovered, interfaces take up space; why not use your most intimate space to connect.

Here are some details:

To achieve absolute personal identification, the hardware would capture DNA from the user’s body, enabling direct participation in the political and cultural landscape. The technology would link remote users through engagement with their areas of interest...

Users view, test-drive, and select their product from a variety of options, both functional and aesthetic. They also set the lifecycle of the product, to be utilized for a few hours or a much longer amount of time. Once users are satisfied with their specific configurations, they have this fully-functioning circuitry - including all UI-interactive and display functions - “printed” onto recommended areas of their skin. Energy would be pulled from the human body to run the programs. At the end of the day, users would simply wash the Dattoos off, beginning anew the following day.

Science fiction authors have already gone on ahead and imagined skinprint technology. In his 1984 novel Steel Beach, John Varley thinks about handwriters:

Call me old-fashioned. I'm the only reporter I know who still uses his handwriter except to take notes…I snapped the fingers of my left hand…Three rows of four colored dots appeared on the heel of my left hand. By pressing the dots in different combinations with my fingertips I was able to write the story in shorthand...
(Read more about John Varley's handwriter)

Although this is a very far-fetched idea, the first steps have already been taken. IBM pioneered research in the area of using a living person's skin as a computer network in 1996 with a system that could successfully transmit data across skin at low speeds. Microsoft was granted a patent in 2004 for "a method and apparatus for transmitting power and data using the human body."

More recently, NTT has developed a technology called RedTacton, which can send data over the surface of human skin at speeds of up to 2Mbps -- the equivalent of a fast broadband data connection. The transmission is achieved by minutely modulating the electrical body field in the same way that a radio station wave is modulated to carry broadcast data.

And is it possible to print an electronic circuit with ink? Absolutely. Manufacturers already "print" RFID tags with a special "ink" that attracts metals in a special solution.

Practical applications? What if you could transfer images from your digital camera just by touching a pad on your PC? Or move music from your computer to the phone in your left hand - by touching the PC with your right? In a more intimate space, the girl you just met could transmit her phone number and other info with a handshake - or a kiss.

Read more about Dattoos via pasta&vinegar; also, human skin broadband networking.

Scroll down for more stories in the same category. (Story submitted 11/16/2006)

Follow this kind of news @Technovelgy.

| Email | RSS | Blog It | Stumble | del.icio.us | Digg | Reddit |

Would you like to contribute a story tip? It's easy:
Get the URL of the story, and the related sf author, and add it here.

Comment/Join discussion ( 2 )

Related News Stories - (" Culture ")

What Does A Tesla Full Self-Driving Car See?
'All objects within my panoramic gaze trembled and vibrated like quick motion pictures...' - Paramahansa Yogananda, 1946.

Satoshi Tomizu Creates Pocket Universes And Worldcraft Bubbles In Glass
'The Worldcraft bubble glittered, catching the light...' - Philip K. Dick, 1953.

Personalized Masks Appear
'The tiger stripes on Jim's mask... made the young people easy to identify.' - Robert Heinlein, 1949.

Science Fiction Helps Young Readers Build Resiliency
'Reading science fiction and fantasy can help readers make sense of the world.'

 

Google
  Web TechNovelgy.com   

Technovelgy (that's tech-novel-gee!) is devoted to the creative science inventions and ideas of sf authors. Look for the Invention Category that interests you, the Glossary, the Invention Timeline, or see what's New.

 

 

 

 

 

Current News

Looking Glass Display Good Enough For Science Fiction, Fantasy
'The figure seemed to be swimming toward the surface.'

Do You Need The Entire Fembot? Maybe Just The Hand
'...Men don't want real women anymore. You and I are behind the times...'

3D Printing With Sunlight And Sand
'We made a crude, small cell and were delighted...'

Samsung Gets Transparent Smartphone Patent
The Transparency of Things to Come

Monkey Gets A Bigger Brain, Thanks To Human Gene
'It's a madhouse! a madhouse!'

Solar Power Beamed From Space Studied By Brit Boffins
'Our beams feed these worlds energy drawn from... the Sun.'

Pandemic Entrepreneurs! Consider Robo Esso Robot Barista
'... the perpetual beam carved in the robot face of the bartender, the classic Irish grin.'

Shape-Shifting Robot From MIT
'... the structure of that shape is retained down to the molecules.'

Tesla's 20,000 Superchargers
'To recharge the batteries, which can be done in almost every town and village...'

Smallest Rogue Planet Discovered In Milky Way
'...a swarm of rogue planets chanced by.'

New Technology For Interplanetary Communication
'... sweating, heat-blistered engineers at every interplanetary radiograph station on three planets, stood by their generators.'

First Lunar Water, Then... Monolith?
'It looks brand new, doesn't it?'

Flying Robot Inspired By Hawks
'The dark birdforms dotted the mountaintops...'

Jet-Powered Flying Suits Tested By Navy
'With his motor in operation, he moves like a diver, head foremost...'

Pub Installs Electrified Fence Around Bar
'I start twelve immensely strong wires--naked, not insulated --from a big dynamo...'

What Does A Tesla Full Self-Driving Car See?
'All objects within my panoramic gaze trembled and vibrated like quick motion pictures...'

More SF in the News Stories

More Beyond Technovelgy science news stories

Home | Glossary | Invention Timeline | Category | New | Contact Us | FAQ | Advertise |
Technovelgy.com - where science meets fiction™

Copyright© Technovelgy LLC; all rights reserved.