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"Writing about the future, I have a vested interest in there being a future for me to write about."
- John Brunner

Effective Human Implant Technology (EHIT)  
  Computer interface implanted directly into the human brain.  

This is a very early description of what sort of equipment might be needed to "jack in" to a computer network directly, without all those tedious computer keyboards and mice.

Truncated optic nerves sticking out like insect antennae, a brain floated beneath the extended black plastic snout of a Sony holoptics projector. As Hughes worked the keyboard in front of him, the organ turned so that they were looking at its underside. "There it is," Charley Hughes said. It had a fine network of silver wires training from it, but seemed normal.

"The George Jordan brain," Innis said. "With attachments. Very nice."

"Let me show you a few things," Charley Huges said. As he typed, then turned the plastic mouse beside the console, the convoluted gray cortex became transparent, revealing red, blue, and green color-coded structures within. Hughes reached into the center of the brain and clinched his fist inside a blue area at the top of the spinal cord. "Here is where the electrical connections turn biological - those little nodes along the pseudo-neurons are the bioprocessors, and they wire into the so-called 'r-complex' - which we inherited from our reptillian forefathers. The pseudo-neurons continue into the limbic system... and that's where emotion enters in. But there is further involvement to the neocortex through the RAS, the reticular activating system, and the corpus collosum. There are also connections to the optic nerve."

From Snake-Eyes, by Tom Maddox.
Published by Omni Publications in 1986
Additional resources -

The earliest known reference to being able to "jack in" to a computer by means of some sort of implanted hardware is found in City of Glass, a 1970 novel by Robert Silveberg. Read more at jack in.

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Additional resources:
  More Ideas and Technology from Snake-Eyes
  More Ideas and Technology by Tom Maddox
  Tech news articles related to Snake-Eyes
  Tech news articles related to works by Tom Maddox

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