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"The world is really so surreal these days that it's necessary for us to blunt it somehow in order to stay sane. The artist functions to short-circuit the buffering mechanism, so that people can occasionally perceive the weirdness of things as they are."
- William Gibson

Kuang Grade Mark Eleven Penetration Program  
  Chinese virus software for breaking the ICE.  

How can you get past the barriers that computers put up against intrusion. You need some really good virus software.

Maelcum produced a white lump of foam slightly smaller than Case's head, fished a pearl-handled switchblade on a green nylon lanyard out of the hip pocket of his tattered shorts and carefully slit the plastic. He extracted a rectangular object and passed it to Case. `Thas part some gun, mon?'
`No,' Case said, turning it over, `but it's a weapon. It's virus.'
`Not on thisboy tug, mon,' Maelcum said firmly, reaching for the steel cassette.
`A program. Virus program. Can't get into you, can't even get into your software. I've got to interface it through the deck, before it can work on anything...'

`What is this thing?' he asked the Hosaka. `Parcel for me.'
`Data transfer from Bockris Systems GmbH, Frankfurt, advises, under coded transmission, that content of shipment is Kuang Grade Mark Eleven penetration program. Bockris further advises that interface with Ono-Sendai Cyberspace 7 is entirely compatible and yields optimal penetration capabilities, particularly with regard to existing military systems...'

He slotted the Chinese virus, paused, then drove it home.
`Okay,' he said, `we're on..."
`Christ on a crutch,' the Flatline said, `take a look at this.'
The Chinese virus was unfolding around them. Polychrome shadow, countless translucent layers shifting and recombining. Protean, enormous, it towered above them, blotting out the void.
`Big mother,' the Flatline said.

From Neuromancer, by William Gibson.
Published by Phantasia Press in 1984
Additional resources -

Gibson does a great job of giving us a mental picture for a tech concept; here's the virus a bit later:

Something dark was forming at the core of the Chinese program. The density of information overwhelmed the fabric of the matrix, triggering hypnagogic images. Faint kaleidoscopic angles centered in to a silver-black focal point. Case watched childhood symbols of evil and bad luck tumble out along translucent planes: swastikas, skulls and crossbones, dice flashing snake eyes. If he looked directly at that null point, no outline would form. It took a dozen quick, peripheral takes before he had it, a shark thing, gleaming like obsidian, the black mirrors of its flanks reflecting faint distant lights that bore no relationship to the matrix around it. `That's the sting,' the construct said. `When Kuang's good and bellytight with the Tessier-Ashpool core, we're ridin'~ that through.'

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Additional resources:
  More Ideas and Technology from Neuromancer
  More Ideas and Technology by William Gibson
  Tech news articles related to Neuromancer
  Tech news articles related to works by William Gibson

Kuang Grade Mark Eleven Penetration Program-related news articles:
  - Chinese Cyberwar Units Prepare For Netwar
  - DoD Computers Penetrated In Cyber-Attack
  - China's PLA Unit 61398 Working On Kuang Grade Mark Eleven Penetration Program

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