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"Science fiction operates a little bit like science itself, in principle. You've got thousands of people exploring ideas, putting forth their own hypotheses. Most of them are dead wrong; a few stand the test of time; everything looks kind of quaint in hind"
- Peter Watts

Displacement Booth  
  A teleportation portal.  

The displacement booths were the sole and ubiquitous form of travel in the future society of the novel.

A displacement booth was a glass cylinder with a rounded top. The machinery that made the magic work was invisible, buried beneath the booth. Coin slots and a telephone dial were set into the glass at sternum level.

Jerryberry inserted his CBA credit card below the coin slots. He dialled by punching numbered buttons. Withdrawing the credit card closed a circuit. An eyeblink later he was in an office in the Central Broadcasting Association building in Downtown Los Angeles.

From Flash Crowd, by Larry Niven.
Published by Fantasy And Science Fiction in 1972
Additional resources -

Displacement booths are similar to the more technologically advanced stepping discs created by the alien Puppeteers of Niven's 1970 novel Ringworld.

In Flash Crowd, Niven explores the idea more thoroughly than in Ringworld. He adds additional material about how stepping discs are used by Puppeteers in his new book Fleet of Worlds, written with Edward M. Lerner.

Compare to the telepomp from The Man Without a Body (1877) by Edward Page Mitchell, the stepping discs from Ringworld (1970) by Larry Niven and the trip box from Eye of Cat (1982) by Roger Zelazny.

Also, see the libra-transmitter from Into the Meteorite Orbit by Frank R. Kelly, the cosmic express from The Cosmic Express by Jack Williamson, Jaunte from The Stars My Destination, the Transo from Time is the Simplest Thing by Clifford Simak and the geofractor (1939) from One Against the Legion by Jack Williamson.

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Additional resources:
  More Ideas and Technology from Flash Crowd
  More Ideas and Technology by Larry Niven
  Tech news articles related to Flash Crowd
  Tech news articles related to works by Larry Niven

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